Formafantasma CAMBIO

Formafantasma CAMBIO

Serpentine Galleries, London

Until 17 May 2020

COVID-19 UPDATES > This exhibition is closed to the public until further notice

Formafantasma (Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin, b. 1983 and 1980, Italy) are designers who dissect the ecological and political responsibilities of their discipline. Their holistic approach reaches back into the history of a particular material used by humans, out towards the patterns of supply chains that have developed to support and expand its use, and forward to the future of that material’s survival in relation to human consumption.

Cambio, from the medieval Latin cambium, ‘change, exchange’, is an ongoing investigation conducted by Formafantasma into the governance of the timber industry. The evolution of this form of commerce over time, and its tentacular expansion across the globe, has made it difficult to regulate. It grew out of the bioprospecting that took place throughout colonial territories during the nineteenth century, becoming one of the largest industries in the world both in terms of the revenue it generates and the impact it has on the planet’s biosphere.

The earliest objects in the exhibition are samples of rare hardwoods first exhibited in the Great Exhibition of 1851, a few hundred metres from this building, some of which come from trees logged to the point of extinction. The newest are the exhibition displays and seating designed by Formafantasma, all of which were made from a single tree blown over in a storm in northern Italy in 2018. Contained in every piece of wood is an archive of climatic change and the movement of natural materials around the world. Cambio also references the cambial layer, a membrane that runs around the trunk of trees, producing wood on the inside, a record of the tree’s past, and bark on the outside, enabling it to keep growing. Like the rings of a tree, the central spaces of the exhibition present data and research in the form of interviews, reference materials and two films made by Formafantasma in response to their research, while the perimeter spaces offer a series of case studies that provide insight into the way wood is sourced and used. Each of these investigations represents a collaboration with experts from the fields of science, conservation, engineering, policymaking and philosophy. Together, they move from a microscopic analysis of wood and its ability to store carbon dioxide to a metaphysical understanding of trees as living organisms.

This multidisciplinary exhibition highlights the crucial role that design can play in our environment, and its responsibility to look beyond the edges of its borders as a discipline. The future of design can and must attempt to translate emerging environmental awareness into a renewed understanding of the philosophy and politics of trees that will encourage informed, collaborative responses.

Images > Formafantasma, Cambio, Installation view, Serpentine Galleries, London Photo: George Darrell

Ishbel Myerscough Grief, Longing, and Love

Ishbel Myerscough Grief, Longing, and Love

FLOWERS Gallery, London

4 March – 11 April, 2020

Myerscough is recognised for her highly detailed and meticulously observed portrayal of her subject matter, which over the past three decades has primarily included herself, her close friend and fellow artist Chantal Joffe, and their families. In this exhibition, Myerscough combines a focused study of youth and coming-of-age with adult experiences of parenthood, desire and bereavement, evoking the complex cycle of human experience.

Ishbel Myerscough, Two Painters, 2019

Paintings of sleeping and resting figures record moments of flux from childhood to teenage and young adulthood, which Myerscough describes as a ‘passing over’ from one state to another. Here, subjects are depicted lounging on beds or sofas, as though waiting or suspended in time. Often painted with eyes closed, Myerscough’s figures reflect the hidden or inaccessible inner lives of others, distancing the sleeper from the close familial gaze.

Ishbel Myerscough, Bella, red, 2019

Beds in Myerscough’s paintings are swathed in mis-matched striped patterns or swirling floral sheets, revealing a fascination with finding beauty within the everyday domestic environment.The frayed threads of careworn upholstery pull textile designs into abstraction, while fabrics can also transform the reclining figures into a tangle of partially revealed limbs.

Ishbel Myerscough, Teenage, 2019

A double portrait of herself with Chantal Joffe depicts the two painters with brushes in hand, alongside Myerscough’s daughter, who has been a subject of both artists’ work throughout her life. Across their long friendship, Myerscough has reflected their evolving personal stories and shared experiences of female identity and motherhood. In this image, as with other smaller detailed self-portraits in the exhibition, Myerscough addresses a new cycle of transition with unflinching clarity.

Ishbel Myerscough, Lilly and Quaye sleeping, 2019

ABOUT ISHBEL MYERSCOUGH

Ishbel Myerscough studied at Glasgow and the Slade Schools of Art; she won the National Portrait Gallery’s annual BP Portrait Award competition in 1995 and as a result was commissioned to paint Helen Mirren’s portrait for the collection and subsequently Sir Willard White. Her portrait Two Girls (1991), was displayed in the exhibition Self at the Turner Contemporary, Margate, UK in 2015 and at the National Portrait Gallery, London, until November 2016. Her work was presented in a joint display Friendship Portraits: Chantal Joffe and Ishbel Myerscough at the National Portrait Gallery in 2015, capturing their very particular artistic collaboration; and recently was included in the exhibitions Only Connect, Royal Academy of Arts, Keeper’s House, London; and Relating Narratives – A Common World of Women, The Horse Hospital, London, 2018.

Bill Armstrong: Chroma

Bill Armstrong:
Chroma

HackelBury Fine Art, London

28 February – 9 April 2020

Chroma is a celebration of colour: vibrant red silhouettes are contrasted against a soft blue background, a bold yellow figure stretches across a swathe of rich cerulean, another figure, rendered in deep violet, appears against a green backdrop.

Film Noir #1433

Through abstract colour fields, Bill Armstrong creates an otherworldly realm. He layers and manipulates collages of found materials, building an imagined scene which he then photographs with the camera’s focusing ring set to infinity. The resulting softened images erase the figures’ features and any identity associated with them to “make it possible for viewers to put themselves into the pictures—so that the portraits can become mirrors.”

Film Noir #1432

Chroma concentrates on two bodies of work within Armstrong’s Infinity series: Renaissance and Film Noir. In Renaissance, Armstrong re-works old master drawings. The de-materialised lone figures are set against a single intense colour, chosen to elicit specific emotions in accordance with or in contrast to the figure’s pose. In Film Noir, the mysterious solitary figures placed against a layered backdrop of colour hint at the film noir themes of existentialist dilemma, yet remain haunting and unresolved.

Film Noir # 1420

Emphasising the unseen by concealing details is the foundation of Armstrong’s Infinity series. Compositions and forms take shape only through blurring dynamic colours together and merging the edges of the background and the foreground. The eye strives to resolve the areas which are left obscured, drawing the viewer deeper into Bill Armstrong’s meditative, parallel world of pure colour.

Renaissance # 1016, 2010

Paul Eachus and Nooshin Farhid Variations on a Ballistic Theme

Paul Eachus and Nooshin Farhid Variations on a Ballistic Theme

MATT’S GALLERY, London

29 February – 22 March, 2020 

Variations on a Ballistic Theme is a video trilogy and sculptural installation by Paul Eachus and Nooshin Farhid, with improvised incidental music by David Ben White. Central to the installation is a ninety-minute cycle of video works in three parts, completed and extended by Farhid following the passing of Eachus. This body of work combines installations, animations, texts and moving images, working with on and offline material. Eachus’ work mainly comprised drawings, photoworks and installations, while Farhid’s work is primarily concerned with the moving image, installations and the production of texts. The artists’ practices overlap through an interest in collage and fragmentation: a form of critical engagement within which the idea of meaning can be unfixed, unrestrained and multiple. Eachus and Farhid extend the idea of fragmentation into a space where events, both real and fictional, intersect and can form new relations. Narratives appear and disappear, crisscross and become entrapped within the trajectory of other forms of assemblage. Their work presents an excess of visual and referential material that resists being subsumed under systems of categorisation. 

Paul Eachus & Nooshin Farhid, Panta Rhei, digital video 2019 (still). Courtesy of the artist.

The three video works in the trilogy are: 

A Bullet in the absence of Air Resistance

Which takes its references from established historical events, reconstructing them outside the continuity of their time and space. Violence is the main contour throughout the film, sitting alongside historically significant events and inconsequential, frivolous or even irrelevant incidents. 

Panta Rhei 

Which depicts a Heraclitan world of nature deteriorated as a result of ecological calamity; a trajectory along which bodies are located within the wreckage of dilapidated structures, witnessing a world in the process of being annihilated. 

Snakes and Ladders

Which references chance as well as means of ascent and descent, where bodies are forced to manoeuvre within the confines of a symbolic game; a game which reveals itself as the embodiment of a gigantic machine, a governing system of domination and state-controlled social practices. 

James Turrell at PACE, London

James Turrell

PACE Gallery, London

from 11 February to 27 March 2020

Pace Gallery presents the second solo exhibition of new works by Light and Space master James Turrell at 6 Burlington Gardens.

James Turrell, Amrta, 2011 © James Turrell

Influenced by the notion of phenomenology in pictorial art, Turrell focused, in his earliest work, on the dialectic between constructing light and painting with it, building on the sensorial experience of space, colour, and perception. These interactions became the foundation for Turrell’s oeuvre, which evolved to an investigation of the immateriality of light itself. Turrell’s exhibition at Pace features four new works from the Constellation series staged in site-designed chambers. The works will feature elliptical and circular shapes with a frosted and curved glass surface animated by an array of technically advanced LED lights, which are mounted to a wall and generated by a computer programme. The light changes are subtle and hypnotic, one colour morphing into the next. The programme runs on a loop that is imperceptible to the viewer, prompting a transcendental experience. With these new works, Turrell continues his exploration of technological possibilities combined with sensory practices and gradient colours.

James Turrell, From Aten Reign, 2016, Ukiyo-e Japanese style woodcut with relief printing, 26″ × 18-1/2″ (66 cm × 47 cm), Edition of 30 + 6 APs © James Turrell

“To some degree, to control light I have to have a way to form it, so I use form almost like the stretcher bar of a canvas… When I prepare walls, I make them so perfect that you actually don’t pay attention to them. This is true of the architecture of form I use: I am interested in the form of the space and the form of territory, of how we consciously inhabit space.”

— James Turrell

James Turrell, Alta (pink), 1968, cross corner projection. dimensions variable © James Turrell

Since his earliest “Projection Pieces” (1966–69), Turrell’s exploration has expanded through various series, including “Skyspaces” (1974–), “Ganzfelds” (1976–), and perhaps most notably, his “Roden Crater Project” (1977–) near Flagstaff, Arizona. Representing the culmination of the artist’s lifelong research in the field of human visual and psychological perception, “Roden Crater” is a controlled environment for the experiencing and contemplation of light and stars, a shared interest with Pace’s exhibition in London. Fundraising is underway to complete the construction and open it to the public. Turrell’s practice has equally materialized in small-scale works, including architectural models, holograms, and works on paper. His inspiration draws from astronomy, physics, architecture and theology.

Morandi, Balla, De Chirico and Italian Painting 1920 – 1950

Morandi, Balla, De Chirico and Italian Painting 1920 – 1950

Tornabuoni Art, London

From 12 February 2020 to 18 April 2020 

Tornabuoni Art presents the first ever London exhibition of the Italian Novecento, the figurative art movement founded in the 1922. Featuring over thirty works of art by leading Italian artists, such as Giorgio Morandi, Giorgio de Chirico, Felice Casorati, Giacomo Balla, Gino Severini and many others, this exhibition explores Italian art in the period between the two World Wars. Most of the works on display come from the Tornabuoni Art collection, with a loan from the Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art in London.

Giorgio Morandi, Natura morta – 1955 – olio su tela – cm 24×37

This exhibition takes inspiration from the landmark 1926 exhibition “Prima Mostra del Novecento Italiano” in Milan, organised by the charismatic writer and curator Margherita Sarfatti, who launched the Novecento movement. In particular, the show looks at figurative art of this period through the three main themes of the original Novecento exhibition: still life, landscape and the representations of women. The artist Giorgio Morandi presented three works at the 1926 exhibition in Milan: a landscape, a portrait and a still life. Tornabuoni Art will display two Morandi’s still-lifes (1955 and 1962) and Landscape (1932). In addition, the show will feature other major works, including: Balla’s Ballucecolormare (1924-25), De Chirico’s Still-life (1930) and Casorati’s Nude from the back (1939), an important figurative artist form Turin who is being rediscovered.

Giacomo Balla, Balfiore – 1925 ca. – olio su tavola – cm 66,5×31,5

After World War I, Novecento artists sought to return to what they saw as the simplicity of the Italian pictorial tradition, as a kind of return to order after the chaos of war. The Novecento artists set themselves apart from Metaphysical artists, whom they saw as too intellectual, and adopted a more homely, earthy sensibility. No other show in London has ever looked before at the movement as a whole.

Giorgio De Chirico, Venezia (Isola di San Giorgio) – 1955 ca. – olio su tela – cm 50×70

Ursula Casamonti, Director of Tornabuoni Art London, comments: “Our mission as a gallery is to spread knowledge about Italian Modern art. Until now Tornabuoni Art London has focussed on avant-garde and post-war artists, such as Fontana, Boetti, Burri and Dorazio, but there are other interesting stories of 20th-century Italian art to tell. In addition, the Novecento movement was championed by a fascinating and visionary woman, the art critic and curator, Margherita Sarfatti, whose story is one of the most dramatic of the first half of the twentieth century”. Margherita Sarfatti was a popular writer and journalist who wrote the first biography of Mussolini, with whom she had a romantic relationship. As she was Jewish, broke with Mussolini and fled Italy when the German race laws came into effect in the late 1930s, emigrating to Uruguay and then returning to Italy after the war. A friend to intellectuals and artists, first a socialist and then a supporter of Fascism, she promoted the Italian Novecento enthusiastically from 1924 onwards. She described it as “modern classicism” and became an informal ambassador for the art movement outside Italy.

David Hominal: PRICELESS / MASTERCARD

David Hominal: PRICELESS / MASTERCARD

kamel mennour, London

December 12 – January 25, 2020

Painting is first of all the liquid, aqueous material binding together the different fields of David Hominal’s practice, from performance to video, dance to sculpture. This is where he takes stock, sorts, and synthesises, but it is also where he covers over, a territory made up of a complex network of inhibitions. His disturbed, at times feverish paintings are haunted by the great historical questions of representation. Their presence is powerful, rehearsing all the grand traditions, from still life to abstraction, without, of course, ever reconciling them.

Recently, sunflowers, pineapples, onions, and finally faces have been appearing on the surface of his canvases. What emerges from the paint in the series being exhibited at kamel mennour in London are hands joined in prayer. As was already clear in his earlier series of masks, Hominal’s interest for the image makes short work of regimes of seeing, communication, and transmission. From religious tradition to emoticons, his totems are evocative of an emotive, hyper-presence of the image. In an incredibly gymnastic play between the long-past and the hyper-present, these hands are just as much Albrecht Dürer’s Praying Hands as those we add to our text messages to say ‘plz’ or ‘thnx’.

While such a tension is characteristic of David Hominal’s work in general, this is also one of his first ‘almost’ figurative series. And the ‘almost’ is important here because it is synonymous with resistance. Though the hands are a symbol of contemplation, Hominal is not at peace with painting. Ultimately, what interests him is doing, the gesture of painting—both on an historical scale, like a great repetition, and on an intimate scale, like an obsession. Copy, sequence, ritualise. NISSAN, GAZPROM, RESPECT, NO SUGAR, PRICELESS, MASTERCARD are all visual impressions, furtive images permeating us as we watch sport on TV, for instance. The title of the exhibition relates to its content like interference. The messages repeat over and over again like a song we can’t get out of our head. The praying hands are an archetype. They are universal images. Hominal is reaching for them through a form of pure cultural syncretism, a pure incarnation of representation, a pure contradiction. PRICELESS / MASTERCARD.

Born in 1976 in France, DAVID HOMINAL lives and works in Berlin. His work has been shown
in a large number of solo and group exhibitions in France, including the Palais de Tokyo and the Centre culturel suisse in Paris, the Consortium in Dijon, and Magasin in Grenoble; as well as abroad, including the Musée Jenisch in Vevey, the Centre d’édition contemporaine and the Centre d’Art Contemporain in Geneva, the Swiss Institute
and the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts in Lausanne, Fri Art in Fribourg, the Kunsthalle Bern, the Kunsthaus Zürich and the CAC–Contemporary Art Centre in Vilnius.

© David Hominal. Photo. archives kamel mennour. Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris/London

Richard Deacon: Deep State

Richard Deacon: Deep State

Lisson Gallery, London

20 November 2019 – 29 February 2020

“As a sculptor, I have always wondered what exactly is depth? It is shifting and ineffable. Perhaps all I can know is surface, the rest a fiction, a deep state that slips away from view.”

Richard Deacon presents his eleventh exhibition with Lisson Gallery, showing works incorporating steel, ceramics, clay, bent wood and ink on paper that evoke different senses – from memory and touch, to sight and movement. This new collection of sculptures, reliefs and drawings also inhabit different planes – from verticality to horizontality – all while shifting between two and three dimensions and passing from porosity to solidity, suggesting their fluid possibilities as either sites for bodily experience or spaces for contemplation and, as the title suggests, for deep dives into each object.

Among his major recent sculptures are the undulating, twisted forms of I Remember #5 (2018), Swell and Under the Weather #5 (both 2019). The complex arrangements of stainless steel housings and spiraling wooden beams in I Remember #5 are presented horizontally, suggesting the viewer walk along its length while following the trajectory of its delicately sinuous wooden lines. With every steamed wooden dowel ending at a different point in a tessellating grid of metal plates, there is an invitation to recall where each begins its journey and follow them to their conclusion. The upright form in pale bentwood, Under the Weather #5 (2019), represents the apotheosis of Deacon’s two-decade-long mastery of the various techniques involved in wood steaming, manipulation and construction, with only the most unobtrusive nodes of joinery completing the object’s soaring, shelter-like structure and revealing the techniques of its manufacture.

A series of ceramic pieces, another medium Deacon has long been associated with, likewise alternate between the vertical – for a number of glazed wall-based works, collectively titled Flat (2018-19,) that resemble lustrous abstract paintings embedded directly into the wall – and the horizontal, for dark clay plinths which sit somewhere between monumental earthenware, non-functional furniture and sculptural support. Indeed, Deacon has previously experimented with ceramics on an architectural scale for his frieze of 39 polychromatic sculptures on the façade of One Eagle Place in Piccadilly with Eric Parry Architects (2013) and has recently completed another major architectural collaboration with Serbian artist Mrdjan Bajic, to construct From There to Here (2006-19), a 200m pedestrian bridgeway over Belgrade’s Sava River connecting the Kalemegdan fortress with a towering sculptural form.

While the artist describes his own process as protean and not fixed: “sometimes it’s a consequence of accident and sometimes it’s a consequence of intention or past history and sometimes it’s a combination of all those things,” Deacon’s ability to translate between one type of material and one set of propositions to multiple others, has resulted in his own unique sculptural language – one that speaks simultaneously in different registers and communicates between industry and craft or between geometry and nature. “Changing materials from one work to the next is a way of beginning again each time – and thus of finishing what had gone before.”

Deacon’s linguistic twists and turns extend to his titles, as seen in the large floor-based work called Swell (2019), which consists of ideographic waves of steel, traversing the space like an ocean-bound liner. The exhibition title is indeed also a play on words, between the political inference of a ‘Deep State’ – the hidden and intersecting internal agencies that operate within governments – and his hard-won approach to revealing the internecine workings of each sculptural or imagistic form. His verbal approach to aesthetics is further explored in a new book being published to coincide with the exhibition, entitled ‘I wanted to talk about the future but I ended up thinking about the past’. First delivered as a lecture, this volume provides a historical sweep of the art of sculpture from Paleolithic handaxes to 3D printers, all while revealing some of Deacon’s own ideas on authorship, authenticity and appropriation.

RESURRECT, Quercus Robur, 1810-2019 / Rachael Louise Bailey & Johnny Woodford

RESURRECT, Quercus Robur, 1810-2019 / Rachael Louise Bailey & Johnny Woodford

Alice Black, London

16 November – 20 December 2019

Harbouring strong environmental underpinnings, ‘Resurrect’ is intended to shine a critical spotlight on the crucial role of trees in our time of climate crisis and on the nature of human intervention in the natural world.

Quercus Robur, 1810-2019 once stood on the edge of woodland in West Sussex, where starved of light it fell before its time. Discovered in the Spring of this year and with the agreement of the land-owners, Bailey and Woodford removed the 200 year old Oak, limb by limb, beginning the careful process of deconstruction and reconstruction.

Rachael Louise Bailey (b. 1975) lives and works between Kent and Brighton, UK. She studied at ‘Statuaria Arte School of Sculpture’, residency, Cararra, Italy (2004); ‘Direct Carving Stone and Wood’, Formation Professionnel-Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris, France (2010-14); ‘Conception de jardin dans le paysage’, Formation Professionnel – Ecole Nationale Supérieure du Paysage’, Versailles, France (2006-08). The genesis for Bailey’s work is in the exploration and transformation of overlooked or discarded material that is often deemed to be of little value or significance yet has long lasting environmental consequences. Through her manipulation of these materials, Bailey shines an unsparing spotlight on the unfortunate anthropocentric realities of our time. In 2019 Bailey won the Fondation Francois Schneider, Contemporary Talents International Art Award as well as the An Lanntair ‘Island Going Residency’ in the Outer Hebrides.

Johnny Woodford (b. 1962) studied at Brighton University with a BA in Fine Art (1985-1988). Since graduating, Woodford has worked primarily with wood. In 1994 he bought six acres of Sussex woodland which has been and remains the focus of his attention. When not working on the land he spends his time split between making sculpture and building structures. Work produced this year include a series of carved and burnt walls for the Andy Sturgeon garden at the Chelsea Flower Show and a puppet theatre commissioned by Cleve West for Christ church CE in south London.

All images > Courtesy of Alice Black, London and the artists

Benode Behari Mukherjee, After Sight

Benode Behari Mukherjee After Sight

David Zwirner, London

January 10 – February 22, 2020

A pioneering Indian modernist, Mukherjee blended imagery and iconography from Indian life with a signature visual style influenced by Indian, East Asian, and Western art practices and traditions. Mukherjee studied with the celebrated artist Nandalal Bose as one of the first students at the renowned Kala Bhavana, the fine-arts institute founded by the poet Rabindranath Tagore at Visva-Bharati University in Santiniketan, West Bengal. The curriculum of Kala Bhavana was structured similarly to that of the German Bauhaus (Tagore travelled to Europe often, and he visited the Weimar Bauhaus in 1921), with students encouraged to explore form and style in an open manner with various mentors. Rather than depicting mythological or nationalistic imagery, common themes and subjects among Indian artists at this time, Mukherjee examined nature and his immediate surroundings. He created works in a variety of media, from graphite drawings to wall frescoes, all of which exhibit a deeply modernist yet highly individualistic and contextually specific sensibility towards form, colour, and composition. As art historian Juliet Reynolds writes: ‘[Mukherjee’s] attempt… was to reconcile Indian folk and classical art with far-eastern calligraphic painting, European early-Renaissance conventions and modern idioms.’ After finishing his studies in 1925, Mukherjee joined the faculty at Kala Bhavana, becoming a major influence on subsequent generations of Indian artists. In 1936 and 1937, he spent time in Japan and China and was taken with the landscape and calligraphic traditions of those visual cultures. Born blind in one eye and myopic in the other, the artist lost his eyesight completely in 1957. Rather than ceasing to produce visual art, Mukherjee expanded his practice, continuing not only to create drawings but also to explore more tactile media, such as sculpture and especially collage.  

Benode Behari Mukherjee, Reclining Man, n.d. (detail). © Mrinalini Mukherjee Foundation. Photo by Nemai Ghosh

On view will be a range of these late period collages. Evoking the style and format of Henri Matisse’s paper cutouts, Mukherjee’s collages are nevertheless thoroughly distinctive and emblematic of the artist’s own experience and style. He created these works by shaping and organising his figures through touch and deciding on and dictating specific colours for the compositions from memory. The collages also reveal how the artist continued, even after losing his eyesight, to depict subjects and imagery that he had encountered throughout his life—from street processions to Bengali theatre—all rendered from memory in a bold, joyous, and vibrant style. Reclining Man exemplifies Mukherjee’s sensibility. The work depicts a figure with orange skin wearing blue clothing and resting his head against his hand with his knees bent. Though presented in a natural pose, the figure’s body extends diagonally from one corner of the composition to the other, actively drawing the viewer’s eye across the surface of the collage. Pointed blue and red lines match the shape of the bent body, further reinforcing the contained energy within the work. Several collages are entirely abstract, and even in some of the figurative compositions, imagery tenuously balances between the formal components and the representational whole. Collage with Fish (1958) features elements of a traditional still life, yet they are rendered as simple geometric shapes and forms. Collage material fills negative space, visually and materially playing with figure-ground distinctions. Also on view will be a selection of the artist’s felt-tip pen and charcoal drawings. These works exhibit Mukherjee’s remarkable control and energy, underscoring his connection to his media and his ability to grasp spatial order and compositional balance through gesture and the movement of his pen, rather than sight. Emerging from the artist’s deep intuition and understanding of form, a series of dynamic, gestural lines become animals parading through space or figures strolling while holding umbrellas, among other subjects. Highly playful, inventive, and evocative, the works on view testify to the deep connection between Mukherjee and his craft. 


PUBLICATION LISTED IN THE ITALIAN PRESS REGISTER BY THE SASSARI COURT OF LAW WITH REGISTRATION NUMBER 447/2017.
EDITOR IN CHIEF: ALICE ZUCCA

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