POST HOC DANE MITCHELL

A WEAK SIGNAL IS STARTING A NEW PARAGRAPH

BY PAOLO MENEGHETTI
The Pavilion of New Zealand features the exhibition called Post hoc, where the installations of Dane Mitchell sensitize us to a resonance from a past that we can not archive. 

The inventory of the artist seems uniquely dispersed. Millions of lost entities (from archaic words to ghost towns, from extinct species to defeated nations, etc…) are announced, inevitably with a solemnity, in a room of the pavilion. Printed, they would need an endless roll of paper. In the virtual fluctuation of all the room (with the piles that are climbing back from the floor), we absolutely will not be able to “cage” an archive. Finally, through some repeaters (scattered in different places of Venice), the visitor connects himself to the computer network for the exhibition, listening to the list of entities.

However, even this situation is not easily accessible. Venice has a maze of alleys, while Dane Mitchell masks the repeaters through the trees. Overall, we perceive a “conservative” background, that is not projectable under the technological modernity. The exhibition is called Post hoc, but encompasses a dispersion, if it is hard to verify what consequences are implicated from the lost entities. The forests have an origin that is solemnly inaccessible. From the wood we obtain the paper; the one in “rolling logs”, exhibited by the artist, will remain monumental. Perhaps we can perceive the printing “in a slash” on the entity that by now is lost. With more dignity, the visitor will try to listen to a farewell on the “memorial stone” of an archive.

Post hoc, Dane Mitchell, Arsenale, Venezia, 2019

According to poet Simon Armitage, the scissors cut the paper, the paper wraps the rock, and the rock blunts the scissors. But that’s a trio that water completely floods, dulls, rusts, dampens. Often we believe that it’s better for us to “turn the page” and leave the past behind, in order to restart life. In Venice, Dane Mitchell installs also an anechoic chamber.

Something where the heaviness solemnly will try to archive the flowing. The contemporary antennae “sin” with mechanical impurity, and with their interferences over a vegetative “silence”. The paper of the artist would overflow after every declamation. It leaves a graphic “rust”, on the “farewell” of the lost entity.

Will we have to recover the purity of the original? If so the bossage will plan a resonance “to the vegetative memorial stone” of the own preservation.

Post hoc, Dane Mitchell, Post hoc visualization, 2019

Dane Mitchell Portrait

Post hoc, Dane Mitchell, Palazzina Canonica, 2019

Dane Mitchell exhibits in Venice, a city that is shaped on the little islands of a lagoon. We like to imagine that the dolphin structures function as “real” antennas… The environment of a lagoon is easily in dispersion. Dialectically spaeking, could this situation be eased through the planning of  conservative restorations? According to Dane Mitchell, the visitor would listen to a “bulkhead” on the past that messily comes “flooding” back, and after he read about some “weak signals” that are “starting a new paragraph”. So, the tree selected by the artist would be perceived between the “interferences” of its own needles. That one is also a bit “packed”, on the pedestal where the gravel allows the bossage to “overflow”. A tree in summer delights us with its shadow. But its noisiness persists, when we replace it with an antenna! Perhaps Dane Mitchell loads the installation with  environmentalism? Surely we tend to respect a solemn listening.

Post hoc, Dane Mitchell, Palazzina Canonica, 2019

Post hoc, Dane Mitchell, Palazzina Canonica, 2019


PUBLICATION LISTED IN THE ITALIAN PRESS REGISTER BY THE SASSARI COURT OF LAW WITH REGISTRATION NUMBER 447/2017.
EDITOR IN CHIEF: ALICE ZUCCA

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